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Courses for 3+1=2 programs

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CourseCourse NameCourse Subject
BIO 181General Biology IBiological concepts emphasizing principles and the interplay of structure and function at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. Intended for life sciences, biology, and health-related science majors.
BIO 182General Biology IIBiological concepts emphasizing principles and the interplay of structure and function at the organismal, population, and community levels. Intended for life sciences, biology, and health-related science majors.
CHM 113General Chemistry IPrinciples of chemistry. Adapted to the needs of students in the physical, biological, and earth sciences.
CHM 114General Chemistry for EngineersChemical principles with emphasis toward engineering. Students without high school chemistry or are chemical engineering majors must enroll in the CHM 113, 116 sequence instead of CHM 114.
CHM 116General Chemistry IIContinuation of CHM 113. Equilibrium theory, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, descriptive chemistry.
CIS 105Computer Appls & Info TechnologyIntroduces business information systems from a business intelligence perspective and the uses of application software with emphasis on database and spreadsheet packages for efficient and effective problem solving.
CSE 100Principles of Programming with C++Principles of problem solving using C++, algorithm design, structured programming, fundamental algorithms and techniques, and computer systems concepts. Social and ethical responsibility.
CSE 110Principles of ProgrammingConcepts of problem solving using an object-oriented programming language, algorithm design, structured programming, fundamental algorithms and techniques.
ECN 211Macroeconomic PrinciplesBasic macroeconomic analysis. Economic institutions and factors determining income levels, price levels, and employment levels.
ECN 212Microeconomic PrinciplesBasic microeconomic analysis. Theory of exchange and production, including the theory of the firm.
ENG 101First-Year CompositionDiscovers, organizes and develops ideas in relation to the writer's purpose, subject and audience. Emphasizes modes of written discourse and effective use of rhetorical principles.
ENG 102First-Year CompositionConcentrated composition course for students with superior writing skills; intensive reading; research papers; logical and rhetorical effectiveness.
ENG 105Advanced First-Year Composition
Concentrated composition course for students with superior writing skills; intensive reading; research papers; logical and rhetorical effectiveness.
FSE 100Introduction to EngineeringIntroduces the engineering design process; working in engineering teams; the profession of engineering; engineering models, written and oral technical communication skills.
GLG 101Introduction to Geology I (Physical)Basic principles of geology, geochemistry, and geophysics. Rocks, minerals, weathering, earthquakes, mountain building, volcanoes, water, and glaciers. Students must complete both GLG 101 and GLG 103 to receive an SQ (general studies).
GLG 102Introduction to Geology II (Historical)Basic principles of applied geology and the use of these principles in the interpretation of geologic history. Both GLG 102 and 104 must be taken to secure SG General Studies credit.
GLG 103Introduction to Geology I-Laboratory3 hours lab, some field trips. Both GLG 101 and 103 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
GLG 104Introduction to Geology II-LaboratoryLab techniques involving map interpretation, cross sections, and fossils. Both GLG 102 and 104 must be taken to secure SG general Studies credit.
GLG 110Dangerous WorldGeological studies as they apply to interactions between humans and Earth. Includes geological processes and hazards, resources, and global change. Both GLG 110 and 111 must be taken to secure SG General Studies credit.
GLG 111Dangerous World LaboratoryBasic geological processes and concepts. Emphasizes geology-related environmental problems concerning Arizona. Both GLG 110 and 111 must be taken to secure SG General Studies credit.
HUHumanitiesThe study of the humanities and the disciplines of art and design deepen awareness of the complexities of the human condition and its diverse histories and cultures. Courses in the humanities are devoted to the productions of human thought and imagination, particularly in philosophical, historical, religious and artistic traditions. Courses with an emphasis in arts and design comprise the study of aesthetic experiences and the processes of artistic creation. They may also feature a design emphasis in which material culture is studied as a product of human thought and imagination.
MAT 170PrecalculusIntensive preparation for calculus. Topics include functions (including trigonometric), vectors and complex numbers.
MAT 265Calculus for Engineers ILimits and continuity, differential calculus of functions of one variable, introduction to integration.
MAT 266Calculus for Engineers IIMethods of integration, applications of calculus, elements of analytic geometry, improper integrals, Taylor series.
MAT 270Calculus w/ Analytic Geometry IReal numbers, limits and continuity, and differential and integral calculus of functions of 1 variable.
MAT 271Calculus w/ Analytic Geometry IIMethods of integration; applies calculus, elements of analytic geometry, improper integrals, sequences and series.
PHY 111General PhysicsNoncalculus treatment of the principles of physics for nonphysics majors. Students whose curricula require a lab course must also register for PHY 113. Both PHY 111 and PHY 113 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PHY 113General Physics LaboratoryElementary experiments in physics. Requires outside preparation for experiments and report writing. May be taken concurrently with, or subsequent to PHY 111. Both PHY 111 and PHY 113 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PHY 121University Physics I: MechanicsKinematics; Newton's laws; work, energy, momentum, conservation laws; dynamics of particles, solids, and fluids. Both PHY 121 and PHY 122 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PHY 122University Physics Laboratory ILab accompanying PHY 121. Both PHY 121 and PHY 122 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PHY 131University Physics II: Electricity and MagnetismElectric charge and current, electric and magnetic fields in vacuum and in materials, and induction. AC circuits, displacement current, and electromagnetic waves. Both PHY 131 and PHY 132 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PHY 132University Physics Laboratory IILab accompanying PHY 131. Both PHY 131 and PHY 132 must be taken to secure SQ General Studies credit.
PSY 101Introduction to PsychologyMajor areas of theory and research in psychology. Requires participation in department-sponsored research or an educationally equivalent alternative activity.
SBSocial BehaviorThe social-behavioral sciences provide scientific methods of inquiry and empirical knowledge about human behavior, within society and individually. The forms of study may be cultural, economic, geographic, historical, linguistic, political, psychological or social. The courses in this area address the challenge of understanding the diverse natures of individuals and cultural groups who live together in a world of diminishing economic, linguistic, military, political and social distance.
SGSocial Behavior The social-behavioral sciences provide scientific methods of inquiry and empirical knowledge about human behavior, within society and individually. The forms of study may be cultural, economic, geographic, historical, linguistic, political, psychological or social. The courses in this area address the challenge of understanding the diverse natures of individuals and cultural groups who live together in a world of diminishing economic, linguistic, military, political and social distance.
SQNatural Sciences: GeneralNatural science areas of study include anthropology, astronomy, biology, biochemistry, chemistry, experimental psychology, geology, microbiology, physical geography, physics and plant biology. Knowledge of the methods of scientific inquiry and mastery of basic scientific principles and concepts are stressed, specifically in those that relate to matter and energy in living and nonliving systems. These laboratory courses cover aspects of scientific inquiry that lend themselves to more qualitative or descriptive discussions of science.