Announcement:
New school coming to FSE

Faculty and Student FAQs

Page updated Monday, March 22, 2021. Continue to check this page for the latest updates about the FSE transition.

The Fulton Schools of Engineering is in the planning process for introducing an innovative new school into FSE structure and will be reimagining two other schools — the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering and The Polytechnic School. This proposed new school will be on the Polytechnic campus with its prominent foci including the future of work, industry 4.0, human-machine teaming and systems engineering. This is an important development in the evolution of the Fulton Schools and plays a critical role in how we are collectively working together to meet emerging societal needs. 

This announcement is a change in how you’ve come to know the structure of the Fulton Schools, and we are excited about the opportunities this restructuring represents to, simply put, make an impact. We seek to advance our academic programs, student experience, faculty research, partnership engagement and positioning of FSE to not only address critical questions but lead in engineering education and research. Further, the reimagining of our schools owing to this restructuring is part of a transformation planned for the Poly campus that includes investment in new infrastructure for instruction, research facilities and personnel that will elevate both the Fulton Schools and the entire campus.

We are dedicated to engaging with the community throughout this process. We understand there will be questions and welcome feedback about how these changes may impact degree programs, among other aspects. We will consider all feedback and appreciate all perspectives.

Our goal is to implement for Fall 2021 and we are following the university’s planning process for establishing new organizational units, and working as efficiently as possible through this process. The reimagined CIDSE — proposed new name of the School of Computing and Augmented Intelligence — will have a strategic focus on computing, data science,  and augmented/artificial intelligence. Programs and faculty associated with CIDSE located on the Tempe campus will remain on the Tempe campus. Programs associated with the newly proposed school focused on manufacturing and the future of work — proposed name School of Manufacturing Systems and Networks — will be based on the Polytechnic campus. No FSE programs are moving between the Tempe and Polytechnic campuses.

Our goals are focused on broadening access, advancing student success within and outside the classroom, enabling the research excellence of our faculty, and comprehensive external partnerships. FSE faculty and students are uniquely equipped to take on the world’s greatest challenges and the reasons FSE has become a recognized leader in engineering education and research and innovation at scale. So, as we continue along this path, we want to ensure that we are evolving our structure in ways that not only allow for sustained growth but will position FSE to make the greatest possible impacts with educational and research experiences that prepare our students to succeed in any pursuit that awaits upon graduation and for our faculty to succeed at the highest levels of their discipline.

As these discussions continue during this important transition, we look forward to keeping you in the loop.

Faculty FAQ

President Crow’s meeting with the Arizona Board of Regents in February presented a comprehensive summary of ASU’s journey, and an overall review of university operations. During this review, Dr. Crow described ASU’s emerging position as a national service university that among other outcomes accelerates positive social outcomes by integrating cutting-edge technological innovation and scalability.

Part of the next stage evolution of ASU and the Fulton Schools of Engineering described by President Crow also touched on the restructuring of FSE, and in particular the introduction of an innovative new school in the FSE structure and the reimagining of two other schools — the School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering and The Polytechnic School. The proposed new school will be on the Polytechnic campus with its prominent foci including manufacturing, industry 4.0, human-machine teaming and systems engineering. This is an important development in the evolution of the Fulton Schools and plays a critical role in how we are collectively working together to meet emerging societal needs.

The reimagining of CIDSE will allow us to strategically focus on computing and augmented intelligence and their role in advancing human capabilities, while the reimagined TPS will help us envision new ways to enable faculty research and preparation of technologically-enhanced learners across key engineering and technology areas.

Why has FSE decided to restructure the schools?

These schools, and the closely related disciplines that will be included within them, will provide students with broader experiential learning opportunities and new engagements across the curriculum, helping prepare them to be career-ready, impact-oriented graduates who are willing and eager to take on the world’s greatest challenges. Part of that preparation is providing students with skills in computing, artificial/augmented intelligence, manufacturing and systems engineering — fields that are radically shifting how we live and work.

ASU is continuously focused on new initiatives that better position graduates to succeed in current and future job markets or graduate school, and innovations that capitalize on the strengths and expertise of our faculty and our location. The distinct structure of the Fulton Schools differentiates us from other engineering schools and, importantly, promotes programs that will not only play a significant role in advancing our local and regional economy but also make an impact on the global stage.

Additionally, the new school structure will provide opportunities that are important to supporting FSE’s continued growth. Organizing key programs into a school-based structure offers the framework to bring together the faculty expertise, student innovation and industry engagement that will make a genuine impact.

When will the new FSE structure be introduced?

Our goal is to introduce the new FSE school in Fall 2021 and we are following the university’s planning process for establishing new organizational units, and working as efficiently as possible through this process.

What should I tell my students about this transition?

This evolution in structure has among its goals to create new connections and opportunities that advance student success both within and outside the classroom, and to position them for success following graduation whatever path they may take. 

Early discussions of the Fulton Schools restructuring plan considered moving the engineering management and the industrial engineering degree programs into the newly proposed school focused on the future of work and industry 4.0 on the Polytechnic campus. With the university’s support, we have decided that the engineering management and industrial engineering programs will be part of the redesigned CIDSE — proposed new name School of Computing and Augmented Intelligence — which will have a strategic focus on computing, data science and augmented/artificial intelligence.

Programs associated with CIDSE and taught on the Tempe campus will remain on the Tempe campus. Programs currently associated with TPS will remain on the Polytechnic campus.

We are now communicating to students that no changes to teaching schedules, including course locations on either the Tempe or Polytechnic campuses, will occur.

As FSE students become more aware of this transition, they may have questions about how these changes will impact their degree programs or educational experience. As we work through this transition, we are dedicated to engaging our students throughout this process.

Finally, to help address some of the frequently asked questions, we have developed a student FAQ (see below) that we will update regularly as more information becomes available. Please direct your students to this FAQ. We also hope that you will encourage your students to find the long-term value in choosing our high-quality, high-impact majors. 

Will new graduate degrees be offered based on the new Fulton Schools structure?

We are always seeking opportunities to create innovative programs at the graduate level, and this restructuring of FSE should lead to ideas for new graduate degrees. We have a well-established process in place where we rely on faculty, program chairs, an academic plan and an advising team to help support the process of creating degree programs. We will be sure to communicate and promote opportunities for new graduate programs and in the meantime welcome your suggestions.

I have more questions (and maybe an opinion). How can I provide feedback?

As these discussions continue during this important transition, we look forward to keeping you in the loop. We will share opportunities for you to participate in faculty/staff working groups in upcoming issues of In the Loop, the newsletter for engineering faculty and staff. We look forward to working with you and your continued support to advance FSE’s academic programs, student experience, faculty scholarship and partnership engagement in the Fulton Schools of Engineering.

Student FAQ

What changes are happening in the Fulton Schools of Engineering? 

We are happy to announce that the Fulton Schools of Engineering is beginning the planning process for an innovative new school in the FSE structure. The proposed new school will be located on the Polytechnic campus and have as its prominent foci the future of work, industry 4.0, human-machine teaming and systems engineering. In parallel with the introduction of the new school, we are reimagining our School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering and The Polytechnic School. The evolution of CIDSE will allow us to strategically focus on computing and augmented intelligence and their role in advancing human capabilities, while the reimagined TPS will help us envision new ways to enable faculty research and preparation of technologically-enhanced learners across key engineering and technology areas.

Why has FSE decided to restructure the schools? 

These schools, and the closely related disciplines that will be included within them, will provide students with broader experiential learning opportunities and new engagements across the curriculum. These opportunities will help advance student success in any dynamic environment following graduation, including in industry, graduate school, or wherever your path may lead.

This transition also sets the stage for the Fulton Schools of Engineering to place even greater strategic focus on evolving societal needs in areas revolving around computing, artificial/augmented intelligence, manufacturing and systems engineering — fields that are radically shifting how we live and work. Remaining at the forefront of current impacts and future opportunities is why ASU and the Fulton Schools are leaders in innovation and we want to ensure we are continuously preparing learners who are ready to tackle the challenges of an evolving world.

FSE is growing and the new school structure will provide opportunities that are important to support our continued growth. Organizing key programs into a school-based structure offers the framework to bring together the faculty expertise, student innovation and partner engagements to make a genuine impact.

ASU is continuously focused on new initiatives that better position graduates to succeed in current and future job markets or graduate school, and innovations that capitalize on the strengths and expertise of our faculty and our location. This reorganization is one part of FSE’s evolution toward achieving global leadership in engineering education and research at scale. The distinct structure of the Fulton Schools differentiates us from other engineering schools and, importantly, provides programs that broaden access and advance student success within and outside the classroom, enable the research excellence of our faculty, and comprehensive external partnerships. We welcome your support and feedback as we adapt to this carefully considered transition, which we know represents an exciting change.

When will the new FSE structure be introduced?

Our goal is to introduce the proposed new FSE school in Fall 2021 and we are following the university’s planning process for establishing new organizational units, and working as efficiently as possible through this process. There will be no changes to teaching schedules, including course locations on either the Tempe or Polytechnic campuses.

What does this mean for my major and coursework? Where will I take my classes? 

Early discussions of the Fulton Schools restructuring plan considered moving the Engineering Management and the Industrial Engineering degree programs into the newly proposed school focused on the future of work and industry 4.0 on the Polytechnic campus. With the university’s support, we have decided that the engineering management and industrial engineering programs will be part of the redesigned CIDSE (proposed new name School of Computing and Augmented Intelligence), which will have a strategic focus on computing, data science, and augmented/artificial intelligence.

Programs associated with CIDSE and taught on the Tempe campus will remain on the Tempe campus. Please note that are no changes to teaching schedules, including course locations on either the Tempe or Polytechnic campuses. Our advising staff will be in contact with you throughout this process to keep you up to date about any changes.

Will new graduate degrees be offered based on the new Fulton Schools structure? 

We are always seeking opportunities to create innovative programs at the graduate level, and this restructuring of FSE should lead to ideas for new graduate degrees. We have a well-established process in place where we rely on faculty, program chairs, an academic plan and an advising team to help support the process of creating degree programs. We will be sure to communicate and promote opportunities for new graduate programs and in the meantime welcome your suggestions.

Share This